TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev

B’haalot’cha (Numbers 8:1−12:16)

This Week’s Torah Portion: B’haalot’cha (Numbers 8:1−12:16)

“You must have the same laws for both the foreigner and the citizen”. The stranger in our midst must get the same justice and be under the same laws as a citizen. 3,000 plus years have passed, and we still have trouble treating the strangers in our midst as God instructed us (36 times in the Torah).

This Week’s Torah Portion: B’haalot’cha (Numbers 8:1−12:16)“You must have the same laws for both the foreigner and the citizen”. The stranger in our midst must get the same justice and be under the same laws as a citizen. 3,000 plus years have passed, and we still have trouble treating the strangers in our midst as God instructed us (36 times in the Torah).SUMMARY:
God speaks to Moses, describing the menorah for the Tent of Meeting. The Levites are appointed to serve as assistants under Aaron and his sons. (8:1-26)
Those who are unable to celebrate Passover during Nisan are given a time in the month of Sivan to observe a “second Passover.” (9:1-14)
A cloud by day and fire by night show God’s Presence over the Tabernacle. When the cloud lifts from the Tabernacle, the people leave Sinai, setting out on their journey, tribe by tribe. (9:15-10:36)
The Israelites complain about the lack of meat, and Moses becomes frustrated. God tells him to appoint a council of elders. God provides the people with meat and then strikes them with a very severe plague. (11:1-34)
Miriam and Aaron talk about the “Cushite woman” whom Moses has married. In addition, they complain that God speaks not only through Moses but also through them. Miriam is struck with leprosy, and Moses begs God to heal her. After her recovery, the people resume their journey. (12:1-16)

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev

Naso (Numbers 4:21−7:89)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Naso (Numbers 4:21−7:89)

A very weird and awkward ritual is described in our portion. When a man has a fit of jealousy against his wife, the two go to the High priest, who writes the name of God on a parchment, puts it into water and the wife drinks it. Horrible and humiliating as the ritual is, the rabbis chose to make lemonade out of this lemon, “Great is Shalom (peace and wellness and wholeness), that the Holy blessed one, allows us to defile Gods name in order to bring Shalom (peace and wholeness and wellness) into our homes”.

This Week’s Torah Portion: Naso (Numbers 4:21−7:89)A very weird and awkward ritual is described in our portion. When a man has a fit of jealousy against his wife, the two go to the High priest, who writes the name of God on a parchment, puts it into water and the wife drinks it. Horrible and humiliating as the ritual is, the rabbis chose to make lemonade out of this lemon, “Great is Shalom (peace and wellness and wholeness), that the Holy blessed one, allows us to defile Gods name in order to bring Shalom (peace and wholeness and wellness) into our homes”.

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev

B’midbar (Numbers 1:1−4:20)

This Week’s Torah Portion: B’midbar (Numbers 1:1−4:20)

We begin the 4th book of the Torah, Numbers; its Hebrew name is B’midbar -“in the wilderness”.

The Torah was not given in the land of its mission (Israel). Learning the lessons from the Torah is not dependent upon a specific land. The Torah, in the words of the Midrash, was given “in public domain”, a place not subject to ownership, a place belonging to all. “Whoever wishes to take it, let that person come and take it.” Or, in the words of another Midrash: “Just as the desert is ownerless property, so are the words of Torah free for all to take.”

We begin the 4th book of the Torah, Numbers; its Hebrew name is B’midbar -“in the wilderness”.

The Torah was not given in the land of its mission (Israel). Learning the lessons from the Torah is not dependent upon a specific land. The Torah, in the words of the Midrash, was given “in public domain”, a place not subject to ownership, a place belonging to all. “Whoever wishes to take it, let that person come and take it.” Or, in the words of another Midrash: “Just as the desert is ownerless property, so are the words of Torah free for all to take.”

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev

B’hukotai (Leviticus 25:1-27:34)

This Week’s Torah Portion: B’hukotai (Leviticus 25:1-27:34)

This final part of Leviticus has always troubled me for its juxtaposition of beautifully poetic language on the subject of the most primitive of beliefs of Divine reward and punishment. In a modern world defined by the Holocaust and untold acts of senseless destruction and loss of life since then, it is hard to view the world in so simple of terms as “good people are rewarded and bad people are punished.”

But perhaps the problem lies not simply in the text of the Torah alone, but in the way we understand it as well. It never says here that our every righteous deed will surely be rewarded, or that every evil act will be instantly or inevitably punished. In this context, what the Torah teaches us in Behukotai is simply this. We are responsible for our actions – our lives and the world will be better or worse for our efforts. And while we may not receive in full measure the blessing or the curse that we or others might justly deserve, we will have earned it, and received it in some measure. And that, for the modern world, may be just enough.

Have you ever wanted to get the inside scoop about the weekly Torah portion? You can now sign up for a weekly text message from the Rabbis and be in the loop. Just text @shabbat123 to 81010 to start receiving this weekly message.

Family Shabbat 7th and 8th grade